Effective Exercise

In the past those being treated for cancer were often told by their doctors that "rest is best". Newer research has now found that exercise is safe and possible during all stages of cancer treatment and that too much rest can lead to loss of body function, muscle weakness and reduced range of motion. Current UK guidelines recommend at least 30 minutes of cardiovascular exercise 5 times a week, with 2 sessions of strength training each week as well.

Exercise increases your chance of surviving cancer because it........

                         Helps you to deal with the concequences of cancer and its treatment
    Assists with reducing cancer related fatigue
    Enhances your quality of life and self-esteem
    Studies have shown that regular exercise can reduce your chances of a recurrence by between 30-50%
    Helps you to physically and psychologically cope with the  anxiety that the initial diagnoses and treatment has caused, as well as reducing your chances of becoming depressed.
    Produces anti cancer hormones and reduces cortisol levels ( the stress hormone ) which causes severe inflammation and can help cancer to spread
    Oxygenates the entire body and pre- sensitises cancer cells to treatment such as chemotherapy and radiotherapy so that they are more effective
    Strengthens your bones. Bones need exercising too
    Enhances balance and helps lower your risk of slips, trips and falls
    Reduces feelings of nausea and fatigue as well as increasing bowel transit time ( making you less contipated)
    Boosts your immune system and increases levels of anti- oxidants in your blood
    Reduces negative body image caused by cancer and its treatments
    Improves muscular strength, endurance and flexibility, often affected by surgery

Exercising regularly helps you to keep a healthy Body Mass Index. Cancer cells can use fat to hide in from the immune system and can make them more aggressive. Studies show that gaining weight during and after cancer treatment raises the risk of a cancer recurrence, particularly for breast, colon and prostate cancers.

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